Photo 20 Oct 337 notes jtotheizzoe:

How do we really know the Earth has a solid core? I mean, we can’t go down there, despite what Jules Verne would lead you to believe.
As I mentioned in my “Structure of the Earth” video this week on It’s Okay To Be Smart, Earth’s tendency to shake and rumble up here on the crust has allowed us to discover a lot about its inner structure.
Earthquakes don’t only send waves along Earth’s surface, they send certain kinds of waves (P-waves and S-waves) through the Earth itself which can even be read by seismic stations on the other side of the planet. These two kinds of waves interact with solids and liquids within the Earth, being refracted and/or blocked by certain liquid and solid phases, resulting in seismic shadow zones halfway around the globe. You can see it clearly in this GIF of a 2002 Denali quake:  

Study enough earthquakes in different places, and you can tell a lot about Earth’s interior.
That’s precisely what Dutch scientist Inge Lehmann did in the early 20th century. I strongly recommend heading over to Meg Rosenburg’s True Anomalies blog to read a very detailed history and explanation of how we discovered Earth’s core.
And if you missed it, here’s last week’s OKTBS video all about why the Earth has layers and how it got that way:

Bonus: You know how they say dogs and cats (and other animals) can sense earthquakes and other natural disasters? Here’s GIF proof, as a dog and cat get the hell outta Dodge right before a quake hits:

jtotheizzoe:

How do we really know the Earth has a solid core? I mean, we can’t go down there, despite what Jules Verne would lead you to believe.

As I mentioned in my “Structure of the Earth” video this week on It’s Okay To Be Smart, Earth’s tendency to shake and rumble up here on the crust has allowed us to discover a lot about its inner structure.

Earthquakes don’t only send waves along Earth’s surface, they send certain kinds of waves (P-waves and S-waves) through the Earth itself which can even be read by seismic stations on the other side of the planet. These two kinds of waves interact with solids and liquids within the Earth, being refracted and/or blocked by certain liquid and solid phases, resulting in seismic shadow zones halfway around the globe. You can see it clearly in this GIF of a 2002 Denali quake:  

Study enough earthquakes in different places, and you can tell a lot about Earth’s interior.

That’s precisely what Dutch scientist Inge Lehmann did in the early 20th century. I strongly recommend heading over to Meg Rosenburg’s True Anomalies blog to read a very detailed history and explanation of how we discovered Earth’s core.

And if you missed it, here’s last week’s OKTBS video all about why the Earth has layers and how it got that way:

Bonus: You know how they say dogs and cats (and other animals) can sense earthquakes and other natural disasters? Here’s GIF proof, as a dog and cat get the hell outta Dodge right before a quake hits:

Video 20 Oct 2,026 notes

enochliew:

Nishi building by March Studio

The ceiling feature consists of 2150 pieces of reclaimed wood and 1200 steel rods holding the wood into place.

(Source: hotelhotelblog.com)

Video 20 Oct

(Source: Spotify)

Video 19 Oct

(Source: Spotify)

Photo 17 Oct
Photo 12 Oct 12,433 notes

(Source: facebook.com)

Video 7 Oct 174 notes

randomthoughtsrandomthings:

Winners and Losers - 2x08

I still don’t understand why they decided to axe this couple!

Photo 7 Oct 548 notes scienceisbeauty:

2014 Nobel Prize in Physics goes to Isamu Akasaki, Hiroshi Amano (both from Nagoya University) and Shuji Nakamura (University of California, Santa Barbara)

for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources

Congrats!
Press Release (PDF)
Information for the Public (PDF: Blue LEDs – Filling the world with new light)
Scientific Background (PDF: Efficient Blue Light-Emitting Diodes Leading To Bright And Energy-Saving White Light Sources)

scienceisbeauty:

2014 Nobel Prize in Physics goes to Isamu AkasakiHiroshi Amano (both from Nagoya University) and Shuji Nakamura (University of California, Santa Barbara)

for the invention of efficient blue light-emitting diodes which has enabled bright and energy-saving white light sources

Congrats!

Photo 30 Sep The British Museum collection includes an astronomical compendium made by Johann Anton Linden in 1596. It is slightly bigger than a mobile phone and Silke Ackermann, director of Oxford University’s Museum of the History of Science, describes it as “the smart phone of its day”.
"It has all you would ever want in one box in terms of time-keeping, finding your place on earth, in terms of finding the date. It even has compartments for your drawing instruments. Like people today who have the latest smartphone, it is very much a show-off piece," she says.

                                                                                          ——-BBC

The British Museum collection includes an astronomical compendium made by Johann Anton Linden in 1596. It is slightly bigger than a mobile phone and Silke Ackermann, director of Oxford University’s Museum of the History of Science, describes it as “the smart phone of its day”.

"It has all you would ever want in one box in terms of time-keeping, finding your place on earth, in terms of finding the date. It even has compartments for your drawing instruments. Like people today who have the latest smartphone, it is very much a show-off piece," she says.

                                                                                          ——-BBC

Video 30 Sep 2 notes

There must have been a Barbour sponsorship for Hinterland. There has to be!


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